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Load image into Gallery viewer, Brahms: Ein Deutsches Requiem (German Requiem)
Load image into Gallery viewer, Brahms: Ein Deutsches Requiem (German Requiem)
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Warner Classics

Brahms: Ein Deutsches Requiem (German Requiem)

4.6
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€49,00
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Customer Reviews

Rattle is fine, Quasthoff is greatThe previous negative reviewer seems lost in his own personal reactions and hasn't given an accurate description of Simon Rattle's persuasive new German Requiem from Berlin. Far from being slow, traditional, and rich-sounding, this performance is 5 min. faster than Karajan from Vienna and 10 minn. faster than the classic Klemperer from London (both on EMI). What overall timings can't reveal is that Rattle takes slow sections slower than usual and fast ones faster. The chorus is smallish rather than employing large church choirs or a body like the Vienna Singverein. The forces under Rattle sound no fuller than Gardiner's Monteverdi Choir on Philips. Textures are similarly streamlined. So much for the objective facts.And the performance itself? Rattle avoided Brahms's music for twenty years on records and has turned to it late, no doubt out of a sense that his position in Berlin calls for it. One detects a certain lack of religious intensity in the opening movements, which is strongly at odds with Brahms's fervent Protestant intent. There's no lift, no soaring lyricism when harmonies shift upward. The timpani underlying the second movement should sound like the approach of fate--this is a work about death--but here it sounds merely like a drumbeat. For many listeners the chief attraction will be the great Thomas Quasthoff, a totally convincing singer of Brhams lieder. The Gramophone reviewer grumbled that Quasthoff was having a bad night, but that would be an outstanding night for any other baritone. In fact his voice lacks a certain stability of tone at loud volume here, but he is never less than a passionate, riveting soloist, for me the best to be heard in the wonderful third and sixth movements since Hans Hotter for Karajan in the early postwar years. Rattle follows Quasthoff's lead, giving us freer expression and hushed spiritual intimacy from the chorus--this is the cry of souls coming face to face with mortality on Judgment Day.I am not a particular fan of Dorothea Roschmann, who nevertheless gets a lot of plum jobs in opera and choral works nowadays. Here she is up against the likes of Schwarzkopf and Battle, whose singing of the Traurigkeit movement is exquisite. Roschmann can't match them for vocal purity, but she is emotionally gripping, which counts for a lot, and Rattle speeds up the movement, making it vocally less teacherous for her. Throughout the German Radio Choir, which I assume is professional or nearly so, sings quite accurately and with pure tone.In all, this reading is a mixed bag. I don't think I really buy that Rattle is sympathetic to Brahms's religious feelings, but he is certainly skillful at extracting a convincing performance musically, and Quasthoff is a joy.4One of the very bestI ordered this recording of Brahms's German Requiem on the advice of Amy Kaiser, director of the St. Louis Symphony Chorus, while we were preparing to perform the piece in January 2011. I now share Amy's opinion that this is one of the most beautiful and moving performances of the German Requiem on record. The diction, by an all-native German-speaking chorus, is THE gold standard for conveying the meaning of the text in a flawlessly idiomatic style. The soloists are amazing. I had to listen to it several times before I was able to sing along on my chorus part without bursting into tears. Worth hearing again & again!5A Majestic Live Performance of the Brahms Ein Deutsches RequiemEveryone who loves Brahms has a favorite recording of his uniquely beautiful and deeply moving Requiem and the competition among the varying performances is keen. For this listener, still committed to the old Klemperer, von Karajan, and Levine recordings (for varying reasons), this now Grammy award winning CD is in a class of its own. Part of the grandeur of the impact of this Requiem is the fact that it is a true capturing of a live performance, something that at times sacrifices perfect acoustics for immediacy. But here Simon Rattle conducts the Berlin Philharmonic and the Berlin Rundfunkchor in a richly detailed, emotionally satisfying and probing reading of this great work.Rattle's ability to find the nearly inaudible pianissimos in the opening movement are matched only by his explosive bursts of radiant sound in the big moments. The choral sound is pure and unstrained and the mighty Berlin Philharmonic is sensitive to Rattle's every nuance. Thomas Quasthoff is the baritone soloist, producing his expected lush tone coupled with his communication of the text. Dorothea R schmann may not erase all memories of Gundula Janowitz's exquisitely effortless solo, but hers is a radiantly beautiful voice, blooming on the top while remaining in the communication of the words. The overall effect of this recording is one of warm and eloquent Brahms and the Grammy award for finest choral performance is well deserved. Grady Harp, February 085Rattle, Brahms and the BerlinerIndividual singers were wonderful. Timing and dynamics were interesting although not always to my taste.It starts so low that it is difficult to catch the sound on CD unless the whole thing is at a huge volume. Also, I felt that there was a lot of freedom with the timing which was not always welcome.4A deeply felt Requiem, even though there could be more hopeSir Simon Rattle is a conductor who obviously holds love for the music of Brahms. With his set of the Brahms symphonies, he proved that he understands the inner world of Brahms in a way like no one else. What about this disc, containing the German Requiem, his first Brahms effort with the Berliners?Well, he's certainly achieved plenty, making what can easily be a brooding, uninviting work seem attractive. Still, Rattle knows this is a Requiem, and he doesn't see this as merely another symphony either. Together with those Berliners and the wonderful Rundfunkchor Berlin, he unfolds many wonderful aspects of the composition. I'll second the remarks other reviewers have made on how German the orchestra sounds. Brahmsian soul and richness reign throughout, with all the elements that make this orchestra what it is in Brahms--there's no point in trying to describe something that's beyond words. I'll just say that the Berlin strings can send you out of this world, with a tone almost dripping with grief. That's not to say in Rattle's hands the work is one of dark depression. In fact, it's anything but that, with moments of clear skies, particularly in the lilting 4th movement. Rattle knows a lot about atmosphere, and there's always an underlying feel of sorrow and regret, even when the sun comes out.Rattle's not very dramatic, but who ever said that a Requiem was about drama? Still, judging Rattle by the very high standards he was later to set in his Brahms symphonies, he's not nearly as inspired. Quibbling isn't nice, I know, but could we ask for more comfort to wash over us? Rattle in the Brahms set, not to mention his recent (Sept. 2011) disc containing the Schoenberg orchestration of the Brahms' 1st Piano Quartet, was able to give much more heartfelt beauty than he is here. Rattle allows hope to come into the picture, but it never floods the scene, which is desirable in a Requiem. Few people could dream of fulfilling what I am asking for, mind you, and I considered Rattle a prime candidate for doing so. Even though he didn't fulfill everything to its fullest potential, he still achieved something that most conductors couldn't do on their best night. Consider my subtraction of one star a sign that I've been spoiled by Rattle's other discs as much as a lack of musicality, because there's sure plenty to ravish the ears.Of course I should touch on the singers before I close. Thomas Quasthoff is a wonderful baritone, and his solos in the 3rd and 6th movements are done with amazing depth and clarity. Reviewers seem to disagree on his success, but I see very little to complain about. What's not to be questioned is his sincerity, his heartfelt emotion. Dorothea R schmann isn't on the same level, but her singing in the 5th movement shows individuality, and above all, consolation. And as mentioned earlier, the Rundfunkchor Berlin sings with passion and a real feel for this choral masterpiece.In closing, this isn't near the top of Rattle's efforts at Berlin, but it keeps interest to the very end. I've listened to it dozens of times and I'm looking forward to the listens yet to come.P.S. February 2012: Several months later after many more listens, I'll stand behind everything I wrote. However, I still find things to enjoy in this recording. Rattle captures the raw grief of the mourner so poignantly that my reservations about his lack of warmth, while legitimate, hardly spell doom. Tommy's singing is beyond words. Be aware that I'm judging Rattle by standards that are very high. The fact that I need to critique Rattle closely to find anything lacking speaks volumes about Rattle's gift as a conductor.4outstanding recording!outstanding recording!5This is an excellent CD, with the Berlin Philharmonic led by the ...This is an excellent CD, with the Berlin Philharmonic led by the very talented Simon Rattle and featuring the great German bass-baritone, Thomas Quasthoff. It is probably as good a recording of the Brahms Requiem as one can find at this time. My all-time favorite Brahms Requiem recording, again featuring the Berlin Philharmonic but led by Rudolf Kempe with Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, is probably no longer available. This one with Rattle and Quasthoff is almost as good and that's saying something.5Fabulous!!!!I have studied and sung the Brahms Requiem for the past 50 years and this is by far the BEST performance and recording of this beautiful piece that I have ever heard. I have previously owned 2 other recordings which were quite stunning with well-known soloists, orchestras and conductors, but Sir Simon Rattle's "reading" of this is perfect as far as I'm concerned. And Mr Quastof is also quite incredible.5A Quality Recording!The quality of performance on this CD is most impressive. I especially like the soprano soloist.5Great rendition, poorly recordedI was singing in a choir that was performing the Requiem so I bought this on our choir director's recommendation. The interpretation is probably the best I've heard, but the recording is not so great, with a lot of uneven sound. In some sections the orchestra is so overpowering you can't hear the choir.At first I thought that it was the actual CD, but I downloaded the mp3 version and it has the same problem.Too bad3
Brahms: Ein Deutsches Requiem (German Requiem)

Brahms: Ein Deutsches Requiem (German Requiem)

4.6
Error You can't add more than 500 quantity.
Regular price
€49,00
Sale price
€49,00
Regular price
€80,00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (€31,00)