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Load image into Gallery viewer, Shostakovich: Symphony No. 10
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Shostakovich: Symphony No. 10

4.6
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Description

Product Description In the wake of his Naxos recording of Shostakovich's Symphony No. 8 (8.572392), hailed as 'yet another Petrenko performance to join the greats' (BBC Music magazine), comes this much-anticipated interpretation of Shostakovich's massive Symphony No. 10, which ranks among his most important and consistently popular works. Branded with his musical monogram DSCH, it embarks on a profoundly personal journey from fearful brooding to thunderous triumph. In 2010 Vasily Petrenko was named Male Artist of the Year at the Classical Brit Awards, a testament to his galvanizing achievements with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic. Review Since winning Gramophone's Young Artist of the Year Award in 2007, the Russian conductor has been credited with transforming the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra. His Shostakovich recordings for Naxos in particular have attracted significant critical attention. 'Petrenko's Shostakovich cycle goes from strength to strength,' noted David Fanning. His account of the Tenth Symphony was nothing other than 'profound and passionate'. Petrenko's ability to negotiate the physical demands of the Tenth, as well as his instinct for pacing, left DJF little choice but to declare that 'if there has been a finer account of the Tenth in recent years, I confess I must have missed it'. --Gramophone, Awards Issue 2011

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Customer Reviews

Great performanceThis is a great performance and symphony. Bought this in advance of attending a symphony concert where this was played. Wanted to become familiar with the piece to enjoy the concert. The second movement is a furious display of strings and timpani. Hard to believe an orchestra could play it! But they did! And very well.4Shostakovich 10ths from Rostropovich/Rattle/Petrenko comparedShostakovich's 10th dates from 1953, the year of Stalin's death, and represents one of the composer's very ambitious efforts, lasting about an hour, and featuring a massive opening allegro. Aside from its obvious quality, the symphony is significant because it has been rumored to be a summa of the bitter era under this tyrant's deranged rule. It is also one of the most obvious instances of Shostakovich being influenced by Gustav Mahler, among other things because of a quote in the Allegretto that is close to direct.I wanted to compare three prominent recordings of the 10th as a guide for the listener. All three are good but the Rostropovich and Petrenko interpretations stand out as achievements.Rostropovich/London Symphony (Teldec, 1991): Mstislav Rostropovich's conducting often is what I'd describe as relaxed. Which doesn't mean he lacks intensity. Rather, he is willing to take pauses and let up from a metronomic pace more than many other conductors. That could represent a problem in the massive architecture of the 10th symphony, but he keeps hold of the overall pacing to present a beautiful interpretation, like in the opening Moderato, which builds block by block from somber darkness. I'd describe Rostropovich's vision as more humanistic than the other performances reviewed here. Particularly memorable are the two big orchestral "sighs" towards the beginning of the first (2' in) and third movements (4' in), moments that I think of as a passage of recollection and grief for what has come before. Each is done very movingly, as if to step away from the tragedy. Rostropovich's attention to detail and musicality are heard throughout, for example, in the very musical sloping of the opening paragraph of the finale. There is obvious emotion in the playing and a vision of what the music means. Despite the flexible and relaxed tempo, Rostropovich builds to a very exciting and well paced conclusion in the finale. This superb performance is helped by excellent work from the LSO and audiophile-quality sonics. It would be a clear reference for most other 20th-century works, except that...Petrenko/Royal Liverpool Orchestra (Naxos/2005): except that young Russian migr Vasily Petrenko presents a very different and riveting vision of the 10th. While Rostropovich and Rattle take similar approaches to the 10th, Petrenko is the outlier. If Rostropovich is relaxed, Petrenko emphasizes speed, architecture and long-term coherence. The opening allegro is boiled down to 22 minutes of stress, a full 5 minutes shorter than the Rattle. It is fast, entirely coherent. Interestingly, Petrenko manages like Rostropovich an exceptional ending to the finale, but approaching it from a different place. All this focus on architecture doesn't cause Petrenko to gloss over details. In the Allegretto, Petrenko's has the orchestra play louder and faster than the other two conductors, but the result is nonetheless haunting. He also nicely transitions from the more active klezmer-like theme louder into the hushed portion. I also found that Petrenko accents the lower registers of the orchestra more. This is my first experience with Petrenko and the quality of this performance ensures that I will need to listen to all of his Shostakovich releases. The orchestra plays well and, like the Rostropovich, the sound quality is audiophile level.Rattle/Philharmonia (EMI/1985): With two outstanding performances like the Rostropovich and the Petrenko, where does that leave a good but not great release like Rattle's? In a bit of a halfway house. The interpretations from Rostropovich and Rattle are similar, but Rattle is something of a poor mans version. I had pointed to the opening paragraph of the finale as an example of Rostropovich's musicality; Rattle is pretty good there but there isn't Rostropovich's level of nuance. Over long spans of music, this difference in quality also comes out. Rattle's opening Moderato is the slowest and comes off as a tad sluggish, although the individual phrases are often very expressive. Rostropovich's interpretation at first seems close to it in character but the Russian builds more powerfully so that the first ten minutes of the Moderato seem to tells one, unified story. Now Rattle is generally very good in Eastern European repertory and he does well here, with an ably-presented and musical rendition. But it doesn't have the vision of Petrenko or Rostropovich. Dating from 1985, the sound is good for the era but less strong than the two alternatives. I'm assigning it 4 stars, because this is by no means shoddy work, but it can't be recommended as an alternative due to the stunning strength of the others.Hope this is helpful.5Petrenko gets a 5I'm a Shostakovich fan and have many recordings of his music: Symphonies 5 & ( -Gergiev; Symphony #-Bernstein; 10 & 14-Petrenko. I also have #6 on vinyl-Sir Adrian Bolt. I'm finding that the Russian orchestras and their various conductors are really coming into their own. Petrenko I rate as tops. His ability to bring out the emotion of Shostakovich's works and his perfect cadence are thrilling. His rendition of #10 is stunning. [I must note, however, that the 7th (Leningrad)with Lenny is my very favorite of all.] Lenny really did it justice.Shostakovich: Symphony No. 105Top Choice for Shostakovich 10thI have some excellent recordings of the Shostakovich 10th by Haitink, Rostropovich, and Berglund, but this surpasses them. The excitement when called for is overwhelming and tenderness of softer passages is affecting without ever being too sentimental. Petrenko gets all the credit--this performance is nothing short of amazing. Petrenko's pace, the crisp articulation he gets from the Royal Liverpool Phil ( the strings play with real bite), and his sense of exactly when and how to generate climaxes fits this work perfectly.Those who find other 10ths to be overly polite or low energy will be in heaven over the intensity of this one. I noticed the 4th movement clocks in at 12:56, 30 seconds to a minute swifter than some other versions. As for movement 2 ( the scherzo), I wouldn't be surprised if they had to have the fire department on standby. At a blazing 4:00 it's a marvel of both precision and adrenalin.This CD also has great recorded sound and that with the performance earns it my highest recommendation.5One for the agesA great interpretation of a symphony worthy to stand with Shostakovich's great Symphony 5. The liner notes by Richard Whitehouse are the best I have ever encountered, analyzing every theme in the structure of every movement of Shostakovich's Tenth. The notes are very helpful in understanding the whole piece. (If anyone reading this knows of a book analyzing the themes and structures of the major classical works, please let me know.)5Excellent performance and sound quality that rivals some of the historical greats!For starters, I have no formal training in music. I experience tremendous pleasure and relaxation with music and my rating is based mostly on the esthetics of the performance as well as sound quality. I listen mostly to regular CD's, with some SACD and Hi-Res (96/24) downloads as well. Sound quality is of utmost importance to me.In my library, for Shostakovich's Symphony No. 10, I have Mvravinsky's Leningrad recording (1976) and Karajan's BPO recording (1981 with digital-bit processing, released 2006). I am generally a great Karajan fan. Both of the above are outstanding performances, but I have a slight preference for Karajan and BPO.I stumbled upon this CD by Petrenko and the Liverpool Philharmonic while reading some reviews on Presto Classical. This performance and recording were highly acclaimed and I decided to give it a try.I was amazingly surprised. The performance is intense, deeply moving / emotive, and the sound quality is simply stellar. You'll probably want to read other reviews for a more detailed analysis of the performance. But I guarantee that you won't be disappointed with this CD. Is it the ONE CD to have if you only want one, single, best performance of this Symphony No. 10? I don't know. It's hard to make that claim. But if you want to add to your library with some variety, this will easily rival some of the historical greats in intensity, depth, and it's ability to grab your attention.Listening on: Bowers and Wilkins CM9S2 speakers and Parasound Halo A21/P5 Amp/PreAmp.5A Performance That Satifies On All LevelsMy interest in this recording of the Shostakovich Tenth Symphony was spurred by an article in Gramophone that named this recording among the top performances. On listening to the performance I can say that Vasily Petrenko has the measure of the music. The performance reminded me of my first encounter with the Tenth from a recording conducted by Evgeny Svetlanov on a Melodya LP.The playing by the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra is superb on all counts and they play their hearts out. The brooding first movement is perfectly timed and conveys the sense of deep anguish without being sluggish. The second movement is frantic without being so fast that the orchestra is in danger of losing control. For me, the movement is a portrait of Stalin although the only person conveying this fact was to Solomon Volkov in Testimony. Although his memories of Shostakovich were disparaged when it was published it has been largely accepted, even by the composer s son Maxim. The third and fourth movements convey the same articulate and steady readi8ng of the score as in the first movement. The climatic ending of the Finale is absolutely joyous and makes me think that Shostakovich is celebrating the close of a very dark time.My only complaint is that with a timing of 52:11 couldn t some additional music have been added. In The Festive Overture at least could have been added or even one of the shorter symphonies could have accompanied the Tenth. Still, this recording is a must have, even if you have a dozen performances of this symphony as I do.5Crystal Clear and Impassioned Shostakovich 10 from PetrenkoVasily Petrenko has brought the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra into the realm of the top ensembles to perform the cycle of Shostakovich symphonies. The 10th symphony remains one of the most popular of Shostakovich's symphonies (along with the 5th and the gradually growing appreciation of the 15th and the challenging 13th and 14th) and with familiarity comes easy comparisons and conductors' inclinations to make the known sound unknown. But Petrenko has the intelligence and the musicality to play the symphony as written, not tampering with tempi or exaggerating sections.The result of this recording produced in the fine acoustic of Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool is a reading that is of the utmost clarity with every aspect of the stunned introspection and raging outcries that the symphony contains simply played as written. The result is a very committed performance, graced with excellent first desk playing, and an extraordinarily fine appreciation of the architecture of the work. Despite all the available recordings of this symphony, now considered a staple in the orchestral repertoires around the world, this pairing of Vasily Petrenko and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra stands at the top of the list. Excellent from every aspect. Grady Harp, January 115This conductor is brilliant ... the recording sensational!I had the opportunity to see young Maestro Petrenko conduct the Shostakovich 10th with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. It was a simply phenomenal performance. So I purchased his recording with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic. Also magnificent! Petrenko is going to have an astounding and hopefully long, long career. My highest recommendation!5One of the great 20th century symphonies, beautifully playedOne of the great 20th century symphonies. This is a terrific performance by Vasily Petrenko and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic. Between 2009 and 2013 the orchestra and its young Russian conductor recorded all of Shostakovich's symphonies. These recordings have been widely praised.The music of Symphony No. 10 is intense, introspective, and frenetic. Shostakovich completed the work in 1953, shortly after the death of Stalin. The great dictator kept a close eye on Shostakovich and his music. The composer felt under threat, especially in the 1930s, but survived. After Stalin's death there was a relaxation of the pressure the regime had exerted on Soviet artists and this easing of tension is reflected in the music. If you don't know Shostakovich, this is a great place to start. British music critics liked this CD and London's Daily Telegraph gave it 5 stars. The music was recorded in Liverpool's Philharmonic Hall in 2009, and the sound is excellent.5
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 10

Shostakovich: Symphony No. 10

4.6
Error You can't add more than 500 quantity.
Regular price
€50,00
Sale price
€50,00
Regular price
€82,00
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Save 39% (€32,00)